Posts idioma original

Posts idioma original

Being gifted does not guarantee success

Peter and John wanted to be tennis players from when they were really young. Peter was a little short for his age, and tended to gain weight easily. John was tall and had an athletic build. Peter’s parents didn’t have the money to send him to a tennis course, nor to buy him a tennis racket. John’s parents were members of the most prestigious Tennis Club in town, and they bought him a racket as soon as he could hold one with both hands.  John used to play with his dad or his brother while dreaming of being a famous tennis player, winning competitions, raising trophies and signing balls. Peter, on the other hand, made do by watching tennis matches on TV, and practising with a ping pong bat and a ball he had got for Christmas, against the wall. 
When John was 8 years old, his parents hired a tennis instructor for him. He taught him all the techniques and advised him to keep training and practising every day. John practised two or three hits, and then he would go to have a soda; two or three more and he wanted an ice cream. He was not consistent, but he still dreamt that he would become an international tennis player. 
As Peter loved watching tennis on TV so much, his uncle decided to give him his old wooden tennis racket and a new set of tennis balls. For Peter, this was the best gift ever. The back wall of their house was testimony of his dream and soon his parents were replacing broken windows regularly, their own and the neighbours. One day, Peter’s dad explained to him that to be a good tennis player it would be better to have an athletic body and money to pay for good equipment and a good trainer.
—Even if you had all of that, the probability of achieving in such a competitive sport, is very low —his father told him—. I think you should study for a good career.
Peter was sad, but he did not stop practising against the wall, every day. He started eating less, and soon began losing weight. And because he felt lighter and more agile, he started practising even more, and teaching himself techniques he found on the internet.
He practised so often and with so much enthusiasm that he soon stopped breaking windows.
At the same time, knowing his parents were making a big effort so he could study, he didn’t let his studies slip.
His parents saw that there was no way they would be able to convince him to stop obsessing over tennis, so they found a club in the neighbourhood and signed him up to take classes with other kids. Peter’s happiness was complete; he anxiously awaited the end of classes so he could go to train. The other kids made fun of his old racket, but he did not care; he hit the ball even harder every time they made a joke. One day, his racket broke, and so did his world. His coach saw him crying and decided to lend him one of his own rackets. To his surprise, he discovered Peter had a spectacular back hand.
John was still dreaming to become a famous tennis player, but he started skipping his classes and only practised occasionally. It was in vain that his parents bought him the latest design, graphite racket and top of the range shoes, he always came up with new excuses to skip his training classes. Regardless, he still won some trophies with his Club. After all, he was tall, knew how to use the racket and had been playing since he was very young. His parents had a glass cabinet made to exhibit his medals and trophies. 
Peter’s coach discovered that despite the impeccable back hand and a powerful right slam, he was not good enough at serving.
He was too short, so he needed to jump to serve, which made him unstable. Against all this, Peter never gave up on a single match, and fought each set like a lion. Peter’s coach told him of this weakness, so Peter practised until he was serving in his dreams.
Peter competed for the first time when he was 10 and won. He started playing in the regional league, and kept winning. By the time, he was 12; he was competing against older kids.
 John continued dreaming of becoming a famous tennis player, and every now and again he would take his racket from its case and swipe the air with it…
This is a tale and not the story of real persons.
If you like sport, I’m going to name two cases —one old, and the other more modern. We’ll start with the older: Johnny Weissmüller, well-known for his Tarzan movies and the TV shows of Jungle Jim[1]. Johnny suffered poliomyelitis (infantile paralysis), and he recovered when he was 13 years old. The doctors advised him to swim to help recover his damaged muscles. He went on to become a competition swimmer.
The more recent case is that of football player Lionel Messi, who was diagnosed with a growth hormone deficiency as a child. I don’t think I need to explain his story, much less   his success.
If we move on to science, Albert Einstein was an introverted child who had problems expressing himself. When he was 15 years old, his teacher, Dr. Joseph Degenhart, told him he was useless and good for nothing.
Thomas Alva Edison was told by his teacher when he was only 8 years old that he was completely unproductive and lacked skills. He earnt his living selling newspapers, veggies, butter, and fruits until he had success. 
There are millions of examples like these, and several movies use this type of story as their plot: the useless, stupid, or weak person who transforms into someone important, successful and rich. 
It always works. People love seeing how someone normal achieves something extraordinary. Maybe this plot is so successful because it rarely happens in real life.
My message here is that perseverance —and sometimes even stubbornness— seems to give results. But of course, in the movies, there is always a stroke of luck from nowhere that helps the main character to achieve his or her dreams.
I do believe that, when the human being works harmoniously and in line with the visible and invisible components, listening to the Essence, the product can achieve amazing things. Plus, the whole Universe conspires to make it possible.
® "The Happiness. User's manual for humans"
Ricardo Lampugnani




[1] Johnny Weissmüller (1904 - 1984) was a Hungarian-born American competition swimmer and actor, best known for playing Tarzan in films of the 1930s and 1940s and for having one of the best competitive swimming records of the 20th century. Weissmuller was one of the world's fastest swimmers in the 1920s. After retiring from competitions, he became the sixth actor to portray Edgar Rice Burroughs's ape man, Tarzan, a role he played in twelve motion pictures.